Spanish Chorizo

Memories of flaming sausage.

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If you ask anyone in my family of origin, they’ll probably say the happiest time for us as a family was the four-year period we spent in Spain. My dad had shore duty, my parents had more money than they were used to, and the living was relatively easy.

I have mentioned some of my Spanish food faves already: Spanish tortilla, paella, etc.  Usually, when I mention these foodstuffs, people at least know what I’m talking about. Here in San Diego, though, mostly only foodies know what I mean when I say “Spanish chorizo.”

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Spanish chorizo is very, very different from Mexican chorizo, which is what people are used to around here. Mexican chorizo is very loose — like ground meat at fridge temperature and practically liquid once cooked. Spanish chorizo is more the texture of pepperoni or other hard/dry sausages.

The really weird part to most people, though, is how we cooked it. Basically, mom would pour Everclear over it and light it on fire. Talk about a fun lunch! Besides the fun of watching it flame, it was a quick meal that didn’t heat up the kitchen, so it was mostly a summer food for us.

I almost didn’t post this because it’s really just a method and a memory, but it’s really good, and it’s nice to have some simple warm-weather meals to share.

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The steps are so simple:

  1. Put Spanish chorizo on a heatproof plate or pie tin
  2. Douse it in Everclear or other highly alcoholic liquid (in a pinch, brandy is fine, but you don’t need anything expensive)
  3. CAREFULLY light it and let the alcohol burn off
  4. Let it cool for just a minute or two
  5. Slice the charred chorizo and eat it on good bread with as many sides as you want: veggies, olives, roasted red peppers, etc.

I’m a little sad that you won’t have the nostalgia to go with it. Or do you? Do you have foods like this in your history? I’d love to hear about them!

 

Author: Serene

I run The Mom Food Project, which was born out of love for my mom and a desire to preserve the recipes of my childhood, which didn't actually exist in written form until I quizzed my mom and wrote the recipes down.